Behind the runway: One TCU student’s experiences at Fashion Week

first_imgReddIt Twitter Image magazineBehind the runway: One TCU student’s experiences at Fashion WeekBy TCU 360 Staff – May 3, 2021 772 Facebook TCU 360 Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tcu-360-staff/ Previous articleWear worthy: One Fort Worth boutique aims to empower human trafficking victimsNext articleHermès and scarves: A look at one of the most unique combinations in the west TCU 360 Staff TCU 360 Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tcu-360-staff/ Pantone: Color of the year 2020 Oscar’s Girls: Tales of a summer spent with a fashion icon TCU 360 Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tcu-360-staff/ Return of the disco: Latest fashion trends mirror the 1970s Linkedin Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting TCU 360 is an official, student-produced product of the School of Journalism at Texas Christian University. + posts center_img Cowgirl: A look at the most glamorous women in rodeo Twitter TCU 360 Staff ReddIt Return of the disco: Latest fashion trends mirror the 1970s Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook printLoading 72%Written by: Chloe McAuliffePhoto courtesy from Flying Solo photographersWhat is NYFW? It’s the most glamorous time of the year. Models strut the newest collections, elite influencers gather with gaping mouths and wide eyes and designers finally get to show off their masterpieces. It’s fashion week. Fashion week is a semi-annual event that happens in February and September of each year, revealing fall/winter and spring/summer trends. The seven- to nine-day event happens in what is known as the “Big 4”: Milan, London, Paris and New York. But what IS New York Fashion Week? You’re about to find out! What seems to be a simple week and a half turns out to be a much more. I was lucky enough to live out the fashion week process while interning for Flying Solo during NYFW’s February showcase. Flying Solo is a company for independent designers that calls itself the “new era for women.” Flying Solo strives to only represent women-owned fashion retail businesses in apparel, bathing suits, shoes and accessories. So, what does a week of preparations look like?DAY 1: Model Casting and a dream becoming realityMy internship began at 11 a.m. on Sunday, February 6. I walked 45 minutes from my apartment in the Lower East side all the way to the Flying Solo office in SoHo. The first day was all about finding “the look,” aka model casting day. From the start, there were over 300 models lined up outside in snowy weather and waiting for their turn to show the executives what they could bring to the runway. Within the first five minutes of arriving and meeting the Flying Solo team, I was tasked with running to the nearest store to grab large packs of sharpies for the model forms, printing about 700 model forms and making sure the line was organized all before the first casting call. In other words, it was mayhem, but in my words, it was fashion week. From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., I took every model’s headshot, filmed their runway walk and sorted the “yes” pile, “no” pile and “final decision” pile.At the end of the day, I was given my schedule for the week, and it went a little like this…A sneak peak of Chloe McAuliffe’s time at NYFW.DAY 2: Showroom Maintenance and IconsMonday was all about organizing the showroom and completing pulls and returns. Flying Solo offers clients and creatives the opportunity to pull clothing and accessories from their showroom for any projects or photoshoots they might have. When working in the showroom, I had to make sure all of the clothing, shoes and accessories were color-coded and neatly placed on the racks and shelves. When a client came in to take a pull, I documented the garment or piece into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet with the designer’s brand name, the color, the type of item and a distinction about the item’s material. One of the creatives I pulled for was Natasha Bird, Elle Magazine’s Executive Digital Editor, who is a true icon in everything editorial fashion to me. Influencer, Chris Lavish, at Flying Solo. (Photo Credit: Alex Korolkovas)Influencer, Chris Lavish, at Flying Solo. (Photo Credit: Alex Korolkovas)DAYS 3 & 4: Busy Work and BusinessTuesday and Wednesday were very similar, quite stationary days. During both days, we worked to pack up all of the retail clothing and floor items in order to empty the racks for designers to drop off their collections. In addition to packing up the retail area of the store, I also checked in the designers with their store name and contact information and showed them where they would be stationed for fitting day. I also designed and built 200+ COVID-safe face shields with the Flying Solo logo for the Flying Solo team, designers and guests at the shows. DAY 5: Fittings and Fabulous Fanatics8 a.m.: Arrive at Flying Solo and meet the new Parsons and NYU student interns8:45 a.m.: Get paired with designers and brands for the day Every intern’s day and schedule looked a little different, because some were paired with only one designer while others were paired with several. I was paired with two jewelry brands: Trend Jewelry and CW Jewels (Instagram handles: @trendjewelry_handmadedesigns and @cw_jewels). The whole day was sectioned off into time blocks from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Although most interns were set in a time frame, being paired with jewelry brands meant that I was going to be on-call with designers and models from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.When a designer approached me to use a piece, I would contact the jewelry designer I was working with and show them which piece was being used, how it was styled and see if they wanted to make any changes. Once each designer liked the look we created, I sought final approval from one of the two head stylists at Flying Solo. Once each look was approved, the models headed to the shoot room to get photographed holding a name card with the brand they were wearing and any other collaborating accessory brands. In addition to the styling, photographing and collaborating, this day was full of networking with designers, models and other interns. A look at Flying Solo’s showroom on fitting day. Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppA look at Flying Solo’s showroom on fitting day. Photo Credit: Frank Raudsepp9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: First time block for designers and models to style outfits for the showDuring this time block, I worked with Hala Al Mamari (Instagram handle: @hala.almamari).Halal Al Mamari dress on the runway, Photo Credit: Lisa ZariHalal Al Mamari dress on the runway, Photo Credit: Lisa ZariHalal Al Mamari dress on the runway, Photo Credit: Alexander Pierce ZetaHalal Al Mamari dress on the runway, Photo Credit: Alexander Pierce Zeta12 p.m. to 3 p.m.: Second time block for designers and models to style outfits for the showDuring this time block, I worked with Ennstore (@ennstore.ru) and Nabys Vielman (@nabysvielman). Ennstore look on the runway, Photo Credit: JosephEnnstore look on the runway, Photo Credit: JosephEnnstore look on the runway, Photo Credit: JosephEnnstore look on the runway, Photo Credit: JosephEnnstore look on the runway, Photo Credit: JosephEnnstore look on the runway, Photo Credit: JosephFitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFinal model card photos for the show look, Photo Credit: Mariya NicoleFinal model card photos for the show look, Photo Credit: Mariya NicoleModel getting photographed in show outfits on fitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppModel getting photographed in show outfits on fitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFitting day, Photo Credit: Frank RaudseppFinal model card photos for the show look, Photo Credit: Mariya NicoleFinal model card photos for the show look, Photo Credit: Mariya Nicole3 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Third time block for designers and models to style outfits for the show During this time block, I worked with Elliat (@elliatt), Mia Cherise (@mia.cherise), and NG2 Studios (@ng2_studios). 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Begin model cards and finish any fittings that still needed to be completed Elliat look on the runway, Photo Credit: Amber MoseukElliat look on the runway, Photo Credit: Amber MoseukElliat look on the runway, Photo Credit: Amber MoseukElliat look on the runway, Photo Credit: Amber MoseukDAY 6: The Show Day before Show DayThe day before the show is almost more chaotic than the actual show itself. I found myself running around like mad gathering outfits, sourcing garment bags and making model cards. That was all I did on Friday. I arrived at the Flying Solo store around 11:30 a.m. after my morning class (I was still balancing school during the week) and didn’t leave until 1:30 a.m. – all to get right back up at 6 a.m. for the show. Model portrait done by Chloe McAuliffeModel portrait done by Chloe McAuliffeModel portrait done by Chloe McAuliffeModel portrait done by Chloe McAuliffeDAY 7: On the RunwayThe minute you blink, it’s over. Although a long, 14-hour day on your feet spent tirelessly working and shoving any food you can find down your throat when you get a chance seems miserable, it was quite the opposite.On Flying Solo’s show day, interns were put at different stations throughout the three story building in the middle of SoHo, New York. The stations included greeting & elevators, press floor, backstage and show photographers/live streamers. Behind the runway shot of a model wearing her outfit.Behind the runway shot of a model wearing her outfit.Behind the runway dressing room Behind the runway dressing room Behind the runway shot of the male models in line to walk, Photo Credit: Matt LicariBehind the runway shot of the male models in line to walk, Photo Credit: Matt LicariItem 1 of 3Behind the runway shot of a model wearing her outfit.Behind the runway shot of a model wearing her outfit.Behind the runway dressing room Behind the runway dressing room Behind the runway shot of the male models in line to walk, Photo Credit: Matt LicariBehind the runway shot of the male models in line to walk, Photo Credit: Matt LicariI was placed backstage to be in charge of dressing and changing models in between shows, manning the long line before their catwalk and solving any potential apparel issues. It was no breeze. The room to change was minimal, and models had to toss their clothes anywhere they could in order to get into the next outfit. And, there was only one bathroom on the floor. Despite the backstage chaos, I was able to sneak out during show five and six to get a look at what I was helping put out on the runway. Being able to see the show in person and see the cameras, people and New York City skyline was incredible. The crowd was filled with influencers such as TikTok star Kate Bartlett, along with special guests and designers and their families. On the runway, shoes and accessories, Photo Credit: Matt LicariOn the runway, shoes and accessories, Photo Credit: Matt LicariOn the runway with model and shoe photographersOn the runway with model and shoe photographersOn the runway, shoesOn the runway, shoesOn the runway, Halal Al Mamari dressOn the runway, Halal Al Mamari dressModels walking off the runway to backstageModels walking off the runway to backstageModel walking in orange and blue sequin leotard, Photo Credit: Matt LicariModel walking in orange and blue sequin leotard, Photo Credit: Matt LicariItem 1 of 5On the runway with model and shoe photographersOn the runway with model and shoe photographersOn the runway, shoesOn the runway, shoesOn the runway, Halal Al Mamari dressOn the runway, Halal Al Mamari dressModels walking off the runway to backstageModels walking off the runway to backstageModel walking in orange and blue sequin leotard, Photo Credit: Matt LicariModel walking in orange and blue sequin leotard, Photo Credit: Matt LicariFashion Week may have been one of the most mentally and physically exhausting experiences of my life, but it was also the best one. I would never trade it for anything in the world, and I am determined to do it again in September. But, for now, I think I’ll keep my cowgirl boots on and live the slow and steady country lifestyle. Chloe McAuliffe is the Creative Director and Design Editor for Image Magazine. She is a junior at Texas Christian University, double majoring in strategic communication and design studies. Chloe is looking to pursue a career in fashion.  TopBuilt with Shorthand Image Magazine: Spring 2021 Sustainability is the new green: Fashion companies work towards environmentally-conscious practices Sustainability is the new green: Fashion companies work towards environmentally-conscious practices TCU 360 Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tcu-360-staff/last_img read more

Valencia coach: Osimhen, others never let us relax

first_imgRelatedPosts Napoli Coach: Osimhen young lad with old brain Aguero could be out of action until November, Guardiola says UCL: Benfica kicked out by player who left club one week earlier + other results Valencia coach Albert Celades admits they were lucky in their 1-1 draw with Champions League opponents Lille.Jonathan Ikone came off the bench to cancel out Denis Cheryshev’s opener in stoppage time to give Lille a 1-1 draw against 10-man Valencia. Valencia had Mouctar Diakhaby sent off five minutes from time after being shown two yellow cards in quick succession.“We have never been comfortable. It cost us a lot with the ball and has been the tone throughout the game,” said Celades.“We improved in the second-half, but in the first-half it cost us. In general, we have had little fluidity in the game because we have been pressed and pressed. They have generated many chances.“All matches are crucial in the Champions League because there’s only six. Everything matters a lot and penalises you for any mistakes. We continue with our advancing options intact and now everything hardens more.”Tags: UEFA Champions LeagueVictor Osimhenlast_img read more

2016 Ohio Crop Tour I-75 Day #1

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Check out Day 1 of the I-71 leg of the TourPutnam CountyCorn Summary: The field had very small diameter stalks and could have problems in the wind. Yield looks like 100 bushels per acre. There was tip-back, aborted ears, smut, GLS and signs of very dry conditions.Soybean Summary: The beans were 32 inches tall and the plants had aborted a few pods. The plants still had many pods and there is average yield potential if they can keep getting more rain. There was a little Septoria.Putnam Co.CornPutnam Co. CornPutnam Co. beansPutnam Co. beans Van Wert CountyCorn Summary: This stand was thin at a 25,000 population and a 110-yield average. There was some limited GLS and it didn’t look bad for as little rain as it had gotten. It was planted April 27 right before a big rain and extended cold weather, which really hurt the stand.Soybean Summary: The canopy was at 33 inches and the first node was at four inches. There was no disease and light bean leaf beetle feeding. There were two to three beans per pod in early pod fill. This field is at least fair with more potential with additional rains.Van Wert Co. cornVan Wert Co. cornVan Wert Co. soybeansVan Wert Co. beans Paulding CountyCorn Summary: This field will yield around 149. The ears were large but the stand was extremely variable with a population of 26,000 or so. The confidence in the estimate may be high though due to variable stands outside of the check area. We found tassel ear in the field and it was planted late, still pollinating.Soybean Summary: There was some insect feeding and the canopy was short at 25 inches. It was podded well but yield is average in this field. We found what may be sudden death syndrome in small areas.Paulding Co. cornPaulding Co. cornPaulding Co. beansPaulding Co. beansDefiance CountyCorn Summary: There was a population of 32,000 with some denitrification due to dry conditions. You could see the crack from the knife when they put on anhydrous. The ground never closed back up. It was planted between May 22 and May 29. It had a yield of 130. There was no real disease pressure.Soybean Summary: There was a canopy height of 32 inches with a node height of 4.5 inches. There was no disease pressure and light bean leaf beetle feeding. There were many two or three bean pods with a fair overall rating and great weed control.Defiance Co. cornDefiance Co. CornDefiance Co. beansDefiance Co. beansHardin County Corn Summary: Planted on May 9 looks like around 150 bushels at a population of 34,000. A little GLS but not enough to spray. Stalk strength looks good but fired up three to four collars,  though not past the ear. The stand looks good but tipped back ears from the hot and dry conditions, maybe 20 bushels worth.Bean Summary: Population around 130,000 and canopy at 40 inches or so the pods were three inches apart with many thee-bean pods and no disease. We saw a lot of hovering flies and a few Japanese beetles, but nothing serious. Good yield potential, maybe in the 50s with the nice recent  rain.Hardin Co. cornHardin Co. Corn fired up from dry conditions.Hardin Co. beansHardin Co. Beans Allen CountyCorn Summary: The population was 24,000 with a yield around 136 for the April 27 planted corn. There was very little disease, if any. The field struggled with emergence early. It was moderately dry here with 6 inches in June and 1.5 inches in July. It just got a nice rain.Soybean Summary: This gravel underlay farm has a 125,000 population with 34 inches on the consistent canopy height. The node height was 3.5 inches and many three and four bean pods. No disease and light insect pressure. They were planted May 23 with average to good yield potential.Allen Co. cornAllen Co. cornAllen Co. BeansAllen Co. soybeans Hancock CountyCorn Summary: This field had 140 bushels per acre with heavy GLS. Half the field looks good and half looks bad. It was planted May 16 and suffered some denitrification with some smut and drought stress. The plants had cannibalized themselves in some parts of the fields with a population of 33,000 or 34,000.Soybean Summary: Canopy highest was at 30 inches with low disease pressure and a little insect feeding. There were several Japanese beetles making babies. Pods were filling with fair yield potential for this field. This was one of the cleaner fields in terms of weed pressure.Hancock Co. cornHancock Co. cornHancock Co. soybeansHancock Co. soybeans Seneca CountyCorn Summary: This field was planted May 23 and suffered from drought. The population is 33,000 and has good ear fill with no disease. The stalk quality is still good and the yield is 140.Soybean Summary: The canopy is at 31 inches and it is a clean field. There is maybe a little mold developing and really no insect pressure. It has been dry here but there was a nice rain recently. There is pretty decent yield potential in this field. Seneca Co. cornThe dry ares of the field show from above in this Seneca Co. corn.Seneca Co. cornThere was some mold growing in the Seneca Co. bean field after the recent rains.Wood CountyCorn Summary: The field was at 34,000 population with a yield at 152 planted May 19. It had the least denitrification of a field we have been in so far. There was significant tip-back and a little green snap in the field from some wind early in the season. Minimal GLS and little insect feeding.Soybean Summary: We saw 38 inches tall for the canopy and 3.5 inches on the node height. We had three bean pods with a few bean leaf beetles. Not much disease in these 7.5-inch row beans. The field was clean with a fair yield potential in the low 40s.Wood Co. cornGreen snap in Wood Co. cornWood Co. BeansWood Co. Beans Henry CountyCorn Summary: There was a 28,000 population with no disease, no insects and good ear fill. There was quite a bit of ear size variability with a yield of 146 bushels. It was planted May 22.Soybean Summary: This was the tallest canopy of the day so far at close to 40 inches. Very healthy with good pod set and still blooming in the very good to excellent yield potential field.Henry Co. CornHenry Co. CornHenry Co. BeansHenry Co. beans Fulton CountyCorn Summary: We saw a yield of 146. It was a replant situation and the replant was not going to make anything. There was not a lot of drought stress but we saw a major insect issue with western bean cutworm in two of the six Bt corn ears we pulled. The population was 33,000 and it was planted in April and replanted the end of May.Soybean Summary: We had a canopy height that averaged 38 inches with a first node around three inches. There was no disease or insect pressure with many three-bean pods. There were many pods with good yield potential.Fulton Co. Corn with Western Bean Cutworm damageWestern bean cutworm cause damage in two of the six ears pulled in Fulton Co.Fulton Co. beansFulton Co. beans Williams CountyCorn Summary: This was a good stand but a low population of 27,000. There was no disease or insect pressure, though there was one ear with zipper ear and a little tip-back. The kernel depth was excellent with an average yield of 195 bushels in by far the best corn we have seen. It was planted May 20 with multi-hybrid and variable rate.Soybean Summary: The canopy was at 38 inches, the tallest we have seen. They were still blooming and pods were still forming. There was a fungicide application and no diseases or insects present.Williams Co. cornWilliams Co. cornWilliams Co. BeansWilliams Co. Beanslast_img read more

Cloud Poll: Which of Our Cloud Startups to Watch Do You Think Will Be Most Successful?

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… klint finley A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Tags:#cloud#cloud computing This week we profiled five cloud startups to watch in 2011. Each startup is one that we think has great potential and hasn’t received much, or any, coverage from ReadWriteWeb in the past. The five were: ClearDB, Netuitive, Loggly, RethinkDB and Tropo. Which of these five do you think will be most successful in the new year? 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img

India Today profiles India’s young adventure sports enthusiasts

first_imgSome people just can’t be kept indoors. For adventure sports addict Ajeet Bajaj, the outdoor is home, and life is beautiful provided he’s trekking, kayaking or making polar expeditions.For equestrian Vanita Malhotra-who set a new national record in Dressage last month-nothing beats the adrenalin rush she gets every time she,Some people just can’t be kept indoors. For adventure sports addict Ajeet Bajaj, the outdoor is home, and life is beautiful provided he’s trekking, kayaking or making polar expeditions.For equestrian Vanita Malhotra-who set a new national record in Dressage last month-nothing beats the adrenalin rush she gets every time she mounts a horse.SIMPLY DELHI meets the two outdoor junkies as they prepare to scale new heights.Ajeet BajajAjeet Bajaj holds the Indian flag aloft upon reaching the North PoleOn April 26, 2006 (0100 hours, Norway time), a jubilant Ajeet Bajaj put down his skies and hoisted the Tricolour at 90 degrees north latitude. By doing so, he became the first Indian to have skied to the North Pole. While he and his team of four celebrated their victory against the odds (and weather gods), Bajaj called his family on his satellite phone and said, “Ho-ho-ho, this is Santa Claus from the North Pole.” A nickname that’s likely to stick for a bit as he plans to head to the South Pole this Christmas.An extreme sportsman, Bajaj had earlier earned the distinction of being the first Indian to have rafted and kayaked in six continents, including down the daunting Zambezi river in Africa. “Having grown up on stories of explorers like Sir Edmund Hillary, setting foot on North Pole was an overwhelming, yet humbling, experience for me,” he says.Bajaj’s love for the outdoors took root when his father took him trekking to Himachal and Jammu and Kashmir when he was nine. This interest shaped his life with his hobby becoming his profession, leading to the foundation of his adventure sports company, Snow Leopard Adventures in 1990. Snow Leopard’s activities include river rafting on the Ganga, trekking in the Himalayas, cycling on forest trails and rappelling down cliffs.advertisement”Extreme sports need mental strength as much as physical prowess.”Ajeet Bajaj”Extreme sports are as much about mental strength as they are about physical prowess,” says Bajaj, as he talks about the training he underwent for the North Pole expedition. It ran for a week and took place in North Minnesota in the US. All the five members of the team (three Americans, one Swiss and one Indian) trained under extreme conditions.Not only were the worst polar conditions simulated, they even trained for extreme eventualities like falling into and crawling out of frozen lakes. The journey itself began in the second week of April at 78 degrees north latitude at Svalbard, an island made entirely of snow and ice that lies midway between Norway and the North Pole.Talking about the importance of team spirit on an expedition like this, Bajaj says: “It cannot be a single-handed effort. You just cannot make it alone on a polar ice cap for 14 days. All of us in the team were there for each other and, in the process, have become friends for life.”Bajaj, who has won a silver and two bronze medals in international rafting competitions in Switzerland (1987) and Siberia (1989), says he is fortunate to have a family which understands that this is his way of life. His daily regime includes a run, tennis and the gym. And on days when he’s feeling exceptionally adventurous, he cycles to office-a 17-km stretch from his house in Gurgaon’s Garden Estate to his office at Vasant Kunj.Vanita MalhotraVanita Malhotra with Hanoverian Horse Pink Floyd”I can’t imagine life without horses. People ride up to the age of 70 and I hope to be one of them,” declares Vanita Malhotra (26), one of India’s finest dressage riders. Dressage, an Olympic equestrian discipline, is a form of stylised horse riding. Malhotra likes to call it “ballet performed on the horse with rider and horse in harmony.”On November 13, Malhotra won the National Championships at the Prix St George Level in Delhi with an aggregate of 64.62 per cent (the highest percentage ever achieved by any Indian rider). Earlier in the month, she defeated veteran rider Lt Col Sunil Shivdas by six points and also won the FEI World Dressage Challenge, the biggest dressage event in India.”Like most teens, I tried my hand at various sports and extra curricular activities, but by 14 I had decided to stick to riding, a passion I discovered entirely on my own,” says Malhotra who fell in love with horses at the Army Polo Riding Club.”Dressage is like ballet by rider and horse moving in harmony.”Vanita Malhotra”Initially I only did show jumping but in 2001, my friend Kapil Modi, who also happens to be a former national champion in dressage, introduced me to his trainer Major Ahluwalia (a national riding champion who is competing in dressage in the 2006 Asian Games at Doha). So you could say that I found my forte at the age of 21,” she says.advertisementCurrently training for the 2010 Asian Games, she rides her horse Pink Floyd for two hours every morning. “One’s relationship with one’s horse is of vital importance. In fact, the horse is 60 per cent of the deal. I’m lucky that Pink Floyd and I have become the best of friends,” she says, patting the majestic 10-year-old Hanoverian imported from Germany earlier this year.A commerce graduate from Hindu College, Malhotra hopes to study further in order to play a more active role in her family’s Haryana-based export business, Svam Power Plants. But at the end of it all, she says, the race course is where you’re most likely to find her.last_img read more

Ezekiel Elliott Plans On “Salmoning” President Obama Today

first_imgezekiel elliott smiles after winning the national championship.ohio state ezekiel elliottThe national champion Ohio State Buckeyes are in Washington D.C. Monday morning, and in just a few hours, they’ll make their way to the White House to officially be congratulated by President Barack Obama on winning the inaugural College Football Playoff. The leader of the free world may, however, want to make sure he has an extra body guard on staff before they arrive.OSU running back Ezekiel Elliott and his teammates enjoy trolling people when they’re live on television, using a move called “salmoning.” Basically, the way we understand it, the perpetrator moves his hand back and forth to mimic a salmon swimming, before poking or tickling the subject right at the end. Elliott, on Twitter, suggested that he’s planning on figuring out a way to do it to Obama this [email protected] thanks Jacoby. You are greatly appreciated. Now we need to plan the salmoning of the president @BarackObama— EzekielElliott#⃣1⃣5⃣ (@EzekielElliott) April 20, 2015If @EzekielElliott doesn’t salmon @BarackObama today, was the trip to the White House even worth it?— Jillian Yuricich (@Jill_Yuricich) April 20, 2015Here’s video of Elliott doing it to the president of the Sugar Bowl live on television.We hope he pulls it off, and somehow isn’t attacked in the process.last_img read more

Rufus Wainwright To Perform At Azuero On The Harbor

first_imgAzuero Earth Project’s first ever fundraising event, Azuero on the Harbor, will take place on September 1, 2012 in the Springs in East Hampton at the home of renowned artist Cindy Sherman.The afternoon event will feature entertainment by Rufus Wainwright, Laurie Anderson, Ruben Blades and Luba Mason in a casual, intimate and family friendly setting. Cindy Sherman’s property on Accabonac Harbor, surrounded by protected marshlands, is a natural jewel that beautifully embodies the mission of the Azuero Earth Project.The mission of the Azuero Earth Project is to preserve the earth’s ecosystems, protect biodiversity, and promote healthy communities by helping people to make informed decisions, take sustainable actions, and share knowledge.The festivities will include an informal tapas picnic of locally sourced food and drink with a Panamanian accent. For sale, and included with upper tier ticket purchases, will be a set of limited edition Lenox bone china plates with images by artists Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha, Teresita Fernández, April Gornik, Mary Heilmann, and Maya Lin. The event will be limited to 250 guests.For more information, click here.last_img read more

Ohio State center Pat Elflein named one of five semifinalists for Outland

OSU redshirt senior offensive linesman Pat Elflein prepares for the Buckeyes game against the Oklahoma Sooners on Sept. 17 at Gaylord Family Memorial Stadium. The Buckeyes won 45-24. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorOhio State redshirt senior center Pat Elflein has been named one of five semifinalists for the Outland Trophy, a prestigious award given to the nation’s most outstanding interior lineman.One of the team captains for the 2016 season, Elflein is starting for a third consecutive season. This year, the two-time first-team all-Big Ten lineman transitioned from guard to center, taking over after the departure of Jacoby Boren.Before the start of the season, there were questions surrounding the front five for OSU. Outside of Elflein and fellow All-American candidate Billy Price, the Buckeyes offensive line includes three first-year starters.Elflein has had a big role in an Ohio State offense that finds itself first in the Big Ten in rushing (267), yards per carry (5.7) and total offense (511.4). The Buckeyes also rank second nationally in scoring (46.5 ppg).Along with the Outland Trophy, Elflein is also one of 20 players in the running for the Lombardi Award, awarded to college football’s best lineman or linebacker, and is on the watch list for the Rimington Trophy, awarded to the nation’s best center. read more

Ohio State womens basketball drops 4th straight game loses to Michigan State

Sophomore guard Ameryst Alston (14) dribbles up the court during a game against Penn State Feb. 9 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 74-54.Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorIt is never easy to win a game when playing from behind, and it’s even harder when you are losing before the ball is even tipped.That is exactly what happened to the Ohio State women’s basketball team (14-14, 4-8) Saturday as the team’s bench was assessed a technical foul for not handing in a starting lineup on time to the officials. Michigan State freshman guard Tori Jankoska made one of two free throw attempts and the Buckeyes found themselves behind before the game started.The Buckeyes never led Saturday as they dropped their fourth straight game, falling to No. 25 Michigan State (17-8, 9-3), 70-49.“That is a first,” OSU coach Kevin McGuff said about the technical foul in an OSU press release. “We have an assistant coach who does it (handles the lineup assignment) and it did not get executed.”The Buckeyes trailed by as many as 28 points in the second half in large part because of a lack of rebounding.OSU, who had outrebounded then-No. 9 Penn State in their last game Feb. 9, was beat on the glass 57-33 by the Spartans, something that frustrated McGuff.“In general, our effort was very poor,” McGuff said. “We were very bad on the boards and they were very aggressive. We did not have a lot of fight.”The Buckeye offense lacked balance as well, with sophomore guard Ameryst Alston attempting a game-high 32 shots and making 11. Alston took 47 percent of OSU’s shots. She finished with a game-high 25 points.MSU, on the other hand, had four of its five starters score in double figures including 17 from both junior forward Becca Mills and senior forward Annalise Pickrel.“I think everyone having a good all-around game is very important especially with rebounds and everything,” Pickrel said in a postgame press release. “It really ignites our energy in transition.”OSU redshirt-freshman center Lisa Blair recorded a career-high 21 minutes played and four blocks. Despite the career-highs, Blair did not score, attempting just one shot.With Blair playing so many minutes, senior center Ashley Adams played only four minutes and was held scoreless.“Whoever is going to play the hardest is who we’re going to play,” McGuff said of his post players. “Tonight, she (Blair) played harder, so I put her in the game.”The Buckeyes received just seven points from their bench Saturday, all of which were provided by junior guard Raven Ferguson who finished 3-10 shooting.OSU is set to return home Thursday night to take on the No. 21 Nebraska Cornhuskers (19-5, 9-3) at the Schottenstein Center. It is set to be the only meeting between the two teams this season. read more

Most Important Buckeyes for 2014 – No 8 Ezekiel Elliott

Then-freshman running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) runs toward the end zone during a game against Purdue Nov. 2 at Ross-Ade Stadium. OSU won, 56-0.Lanter file photoWith two already listed, the top-10 most important Buckeyes continues as the countdown to kickoff stands at just eight weeks.No. 8 Most Important Buckeyes: Ezekiel Elliott, sophomore running backAmidst a season filled with outstanding offensive output, Carlos Hyde became OSU coach Urban Meyer’s first 1,000-yard back – despite having missed the first three games of the season.Half a year later, Hyde is a member of the San Francisco 49ers and the Buckeyes are looking to fill the 1,521-yard hole that he left.Fortunately for OSU, roaming the sidelines for the Buckeyes during the 2013 season was a former four-star running back prospect, built almost exactly in the likeness of Hyde himself.His name: Ezekiel Elliott.While he may possess Hyde’s lethal combination of size and speed that any running backs coach in America would yearn for, Elliott certainly has a tall task in front of him to replicate the performance of No. 34.In his freshman campaign, Elliott showed flashes of brilliance when provided the opportunity to touch the turf.For instance, Buckeye fans will certainly remember his coming out party against Florida A&M, when the seemingly unknown No. 15 darted onto the field and rushed for 162 yards and two touchdowns on just 14 carries.Outside of that afternoon, however, Elliott amassed just 16 carries for the rest of the season, which makes prognosticating his impact next season that much more difficult.Elliott’s sophomore campaign could go one of three ways.The first scenario is one in which Elliott mirrors Hyde in almost every circumstance and becomes Urban Meyer’s first multi-season 1,000-yard running back. His immense speed with his “bowling ball” stature gives him an element Hyde never possessed and turns him immediately into a faster version of his predecessor with the same impact each time he touches the ball.This scenario renders itself rather unlikely, but if it were to unfold, OSU could very well be the front-runner to win the 2014 National Championship.The second scenario is the most likely: Elliott is a less experienced, less effective version of Hyde who barely becomes the second 1,000-yard running back under Meyer. Again, Elliott seems to have all the tools but may have trouble adjusting to the college game in his first season as a starter.In the final scenario, Elliott isn’t at all prepared for a starting role in the backfield, forcing senior quarterback Braxton Miller and sophomore H-back Dontre Wilson to shoulder the entirety of the offensive load, which figures to be too much and holds OSU back for the entire season.Based on what we saw from Elliott a year ago – if only in a couple of games – it seems as if this would be the least likely scenario.Coach Meyer constantly lauded Elliott last season for his work ethic and his demeanor both on and off the field, which would seem to prove that he’s going to put in the work necessary to ensure this is not the case next season.Again, anything can happen, but this would be more a surprise than an eventuality.Should this list only have consisted of offensive players, it’s easy to see how Elliott could very well rank amongst the top two or three most important Buckeyes.At his best, he could elevate the Buckeyes to a National Championship.At his worst, he could drag OSU to its most mediocre season in Urban Meyer’s tenure. read more