Confident Groves predicts early stoppage

first_imgGeorge Groves has predicted another quick victory at Wembley Arena when he faces Kenny Anderson there on 16 March.The Hammersmith super-middleweight, 23, blasted away Paul Smith in two rounds at the same venue in November.And he has pledged to be just as explosive in his rematch with Anderson when he defends his British title against the Scot.Anderson caused him problems when they met in 2010, flooring the Londoner before Groves recovered to stop his opponent in the sixth round.But Groves said: “I’ve come on since we last fought and I can’t see him going as far as the sixth round this time. He’ll go earlier.“I’m expecting a tough fight. I’m not underestimating him and he’s going to want to prove that the last time was a mistake.“I’ve beaten James DeGale and Paul Smith and now I’ve got to beat Anderson before I move onto the next level.”Related stories and features:Groves set for rematch with AndersonA work in progressI’m not world class – yetGroves blasts away Smith at Wembley‘Ugly kid’ looks the partLet history decideOnes to watch in 2012Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Kevin Durant considers a world in which the Warriors three-peat, and it sounds awesome

first_imgWelcome to another episode of, “One of the Warriors’ core four said it, so we are obligated to beat it into the earth’s crust.”In this installment, Kevin Durant answered a question from Yahoo’s Chris Haynes regarding the likelihood and/or the fallout of a potential Golden State three-peat in 2018-19.“I know for a fact that we’ll all get our jerseys retired,” Durant responded. “We’ll probably all get statues in front of the Chase Center. We’ll be buried legends forever, meaning that people …last_img

Animal Magnetism and Other Wonders

first_imgWhat is it that so attracts us to animals?  Is it animal magnetism?  Some animals do have magnetic senses that can guide them across oceans.  The more we learn about animals, the more we should admire their high-tech equipment.  Here are some recent examples of amazing animals, some of them suitable for Halloween decorations. Eensy weensy wonder spider:  After cockroaches, spiders are the second most vibration-sensitive creatures, reported PhysOrg.  Researchers at the University of Vienna used scanning white light interferometry and micro-force measurements to measure the strain sensors on a species of wandering spider that detects vibrations on leaves to detect prey.  Strain sensors?  Yes.  Here’s how they work: “Team member Friedrich G. Barth explained that the spider has over 3,000 strain sensors in its body, mostly on the legs and in vibration receptors located near the leg joints,” the article said.  “Each strain sensor comprises a series of arrays of tiny parallel slits in the compound lyriform [lyre-shaped] slit sense organs that detect vibrations and movements. When forces are applied the slits are compressed and stimulated.”  And that’s not all: spiders can see in the dark and sense odors on their antennae.  Remember that when you see spider decorations for Halloween. Giant spider webs:  Some spiders can cross rivers with their giant webs.  The species Caerostris darwini, endemic to Madagascar, builds “the largest known orb webs utilizing the toughest known silk.”  PLoS ONE reported findings of a team who studied the web-building activity of these spiders that were just discovered last year (9/24/2010).  The webs of C. darwini are made of silk combining strength and great elasticity such that it outperforms all other known spider silks, and even most synthetic fibers, in terms of toughness (work required to fracture the silk),” the researchers said; “Furthermore, capture areas of C. darwini webs regularly exceed 1 m in diameter and are suspended on bridge lines that often exceed 10 meters, while the largest capture areas reach almost 2 meters in diameter and are suspended on bridge lines up to 25 meters in length.”  The team wanted to know how the spiders manage to bridge such large distances, and whether the silk toughness co-evolved with this ability.  They watched 32 spiders in action.  The spider starts by spinning a “bridging silk” that consists of several strands that catch the wind then recombine within 24 seconds into a line that gets tangled in vegetation across the stream.  The spider then “reels in” the bridging line, from which it can travel out and start constructing its large orb web above the water.  It drops a vertical line in the center, forming a T structure, from which it creates diagonals up to the bridge line, resulting in a triangular web.  Within hours, the web is complete.  Curious readers may wish to visit the open-source paper for details how the spiders build their world-record webs.  The authors could not do more than speculate on how their specific adaptations evolved.  Citation: Gregorič M, Agnarsson I, Blackledge TA, Kuntner M, 2011. How Did the Spider Cross the River? Behavioral Adaptations for River-Bridging Webs in Caerostris darwini (Araneae: Araneidae). PLoS ONE 6(10): e26847. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026847. Glow in the dark:  What could be spookier than eerie green lights in the dark?  Biological light – bioluminescence – is common among marine and land animals.  Among glowing sea creatures are tiny unicellular animals living in surface plankton called dinoflagellates.  They give rise to the “red tide” under certain conditions when they bloom in large numbers.  During red tides, night-time beachgoers can see the waves glowing with a spooky blue-green light, and every step on the wet sand produces a hundred sparkles.  An explanation for how these tiny organisms scintillate when mechanically stimulated was reported on Science Daily.  Here’s how the article described the “novel mechanism” that produces a “beautiful natural phenomenon in our oceans”— As dinoflagellates float, mechanical stimulation generated by the movement of surrounding water sends electrical impulses around an internal compartment within the organism, called a vacuole–which holds an abundance of protons.  These electrical impulses open so-called voltage-sensitive proton channels that connect the vacuole to tiny pockets dotting the vacuole membrane, known as scintillons.  Once opened, the voltage-sensitive proton channels may funnel protons from the vacuole into the scintillons. Protons entering the scintillons then activate luciferase—a protein, which produces flashes of light, that is stored in scintillons. Ghost sense:  An article on Science Daily is permeated with evolutionary speculation, but the observational part is cool.  Many species of “primitive” fish, including sharks, paddlefishes and certain other aquatic vertebrates, have the ability to “detect weak electrical fields in the water and use this information to detect prey, communicate and orient themselves.”  Readers can judge whether they buy the claim that humans evolved from a common ancestor with this sixth sense that lived hundreds of millions of years ago, but it is remarkable that any animal would have electroreception organs and the brain power to use that information. Cookie cutter cats with steak knives:  PhysOrg had an interesting article about the extinct sabre-tooth cats that once roamed North America, Europe and Asia.  Fierce hunters, some were large, sleek animals, some with bodies like cheetahs equipped for pursuit, and others (like California’s Smilodon, found in the La Brea Tar Pits) were more muscular, like bears.  Facial adaptations, such as larger lips and jowls than seen in modern cats, added to their abilities.  Virginia Naples of Northern Illinois University, who owns two cute tabby cats, has a fascination with the large sabre-tooths.  With her colleagues, she has published a new book updating what is known about the various species.  One species they dubbed the Cookie-Cutter Cat “for its ability to chomp a large, clean chunk of flesh from its prey.”  It sported serrated biting teeth 3.5 inches long.  “It had a whole mouthful of steak knives,” Naples said.  Happy Halloween. Unerringly across the sea:  Among the animals that use the Earth’s magnetic field to navigate (e.g., birds, Monarch butterflies, sea turtles), inherited instructions somehow allow the creatures to find their targets without ever having seen it before (for a detailed description of the Monarch butterfly migration, see the new documentary Metamorphosis).  In the latest edition of Current Biology (21:20, R843-R846, 25 October 2011, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2011.09.002), Thomas and Matthew Collett explored how loggerhead turtles follow “signposts in the sea” to navigate their large oval circuits.  In the lab, scientists can alter the hatchlings’ swimming orientation with magnetic fields.  Out in the ocean, hatchlings mature for a few years in the Sargasso Sea, but then must migrate back to the Florida coast; fortunately, “hatchlings come equipped with instructions to provide this active navigation,” the authors said.  When scientists play a cruel joke on them (in the name of research) and put hatchlings far north near the coast of Greenland, they don’t know what to do.  Older individuals, however, can calculate the difference between actual and expected, and find the way back.  “The technique of teleporting turtles and other animals to magnetically defined places, which works so well for understanding the turtles’ inherited routes, is also revealing map-like navigational strategies in older individuals that have learnt or become imprinted on particular locations.”  Similar behaviors have been observed in red spotted newts and lobsters, the authors said. Rudolph’s coat:  Halloween’s passing means Christmas is not far away, with its iconic images of reindeer.  Real reindeer may not fly, but have some cool tricks for maintaining body heat.  “Insulated in a luxuriously thick winter coat, reindeer are perfectly prepared for the gripping cold of an Arctic winter, PhysOrg reported.  “But the pelt doesn’t just keep the cold out, it keeps the warmth in too: which is fine when the animals are resting….”  Problem: Rudolph has to bolt through the snow when Santa cracks the whip.  His body temperature soars.  Now what?  A Norwegian scientist figured out three strategies the reindeer uses: “panting with their mouths closed to evaporate water from the nose; panting with the mouth open to evaporate water from the tongue; and activating a cooling system that selectively cools the blood supply to the brain.”  Like dogs, reindeer have large, wet tongues good for evaporative cooling.  Problem 2: How does Rudolph coordinate the three methods?  Norwegian scientists took measurements by playing Santa and exercising their cooperative deer, and found that “reindeer use… a heat exchanger when their temperature becomes dangerously high”.  Heat exchanger?  Yes; “They began selectively cooling the brain by diverting cooled venous blood – which came from the nose – away from the body and up into the head, where it entered a network of heat exchanging blood vessels to cool the hot arterial blood destined for the brain to protect it from overheating.”  By inhaling colossal amounts of cold air, the article explained, “reindeers were able to inhale sufficient cold air through their noses to keep their brains cool, but only as a last resort once the other cooling tactics were no longer sufficient.”  And that is how heavily-coated reindeer keep their cool. There’s no end of wonders to study in the biological world.  How did they come to be?  By random, purposeless, directionless processes?  A reindeer needs all those strategies in place to survive a lengthy escape from a predator.  Turtles without navigation will never make it home to lay eggs.  Spiders without strain sensors and dark-adapted eyes could not eat.  Even the tiny dinoflagellates have irreducibly-complex systems to produce their mechanically-induced sparkles. Mutations are almost all harmful or neutral.  Beneficial mutations, almost unknown in genetics (the controversial examples often with damaging pleiotropic side effects) could never accumulate fast enough to create any of these abilities described above.  The Creator put into each animal the initial equipment to thrive and the genetic ability to adapt to changing environments, such as those encountered by the Madagascar spiders (no credit to Darwin).  An environment cannot create an adaptation any more than a mountain can create a mountain climber.  Let’s rid ourselves of evolutionary myths and face the facts of nature with humility and wonder.  Science should be a treasure hunt.  Kick the useless storytelling charlatans off the field, and let’s go hunting!(Visited 36 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Producteev: Social Task Management for Small Groups

first_imgFriendFeed for Productivity AppsProducteev also offers what it calls a “FriendFeed for your productivity apps.” The service can aggregate the activity from team members on Zoho, Google Reader, Docstoc, GitHub, SlideShare, and others. The company will continue to add support for other services, including Google Docs, in the near future. If a team member uploads a new document to Zoho, for example, a notification will appear in the other team members’ Producteev real-time live feed, which is available on the site and in the mobile and desktop apps. This feed was clearly modeled after the Facebook news feed – down to the notifications icon in the bottom right corner of the window. Just like in FriendFeed and Facebook, users can ‘like’ status updates and comment on them. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… frederic lardinois 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market In addition, of course, Producteev also offers all the standard task management features one would expect from a modern task management applicaiton, including the ability to delegate tasks to other team members. Users can also upload files and Producteev offers a basic revision system for these files as well. Another nice feature is that users can add new tasks by sending a DM to Producteev’s Twitter account or by sending an email to Producteev. These social features also set Producteev apart from some if its competitors, including Basecamp. It is also important to note that Producteev offers apps for a wide range of mobile phones, including the iPhone (iTunes link), Android, Windows Mobile, and Nokia S60 phones. In addition, there is also a cross-platform Adobe Air app and a Blackberry client will be released within the next couple of days.PricingProducteev offers 7 different account types, ranging from free trial accounts with three users and 10MB of storage ($5/month after the free trial) all the way up to the Gold business account ($99/month) for up to 100 users and 1GB of storage. There are three different tiers of business accounts (Bronze, Silver, Gold), all of which feature customizable dashboards, sync with Outlook and iCal, as well as priority support by email. There is also a free account for students, with support for up to 40 users. According to Ilan Abehassera, Producteev’s founder and CEO, the educational market is clearly on the company’s radar and Producteev is working on a number of deals that would provide a white-label version of its service to universities and colleges.Get a Free Gold Account Producteev gave us 10 Gold accounts ($99/month) to give away to our readers. These will be valid for one year. If you want one, leave us a comment below within the next 24 hours and explain how you would use this application for personal or business use. We will pick the 10 most interesting comments and Producteev will set you up with a Gold account. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Producteev is a very well-designed online task management and collaboration service for individuals and small groups. Producteev started out as a task management system, but today, the company is adding a number of interesting collaboration features as well. If Producteev only offered yet anther task management service, this wouldn’t be a very exciting product (how many online task managers do we really need, after all?). What makes Producteev stand out is that it is nicely integrated with Twitter, Facebook, and a large number of online productivity apps. The company also offers mobile apps for virtually every popular platform. We are giving away 10 pro accounts for Producteev. Read on to find out how you can get yours. Tags:#Product Reviews#web Related Posts Crowdsourcing Tasks on Twitter and FacebookAs the company’s founder and CEO Ilan Abehassera told us earlier today, Producteev wants to be a “multichannel group productivity application” that goes far beyond simple task management for groups. The most interesting new feature Producteev launched today is the ability to “crowdsource tasks.” This features allows users to make some of their tasks public and publish them to their Twitter or Facebook feeds. These messages will then include a shortened link back to Producteev, where your friends, colleagues, and random followers can provide you with answers or ideas (after identifying themselves through Facebook Connect or Twitter Connect). Basically, this feature allows you to manage all the answers you would usually get as @replies on Twitter, for example.last_img read more