2016 Ohio Crop Tour I-75 Day #1

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Check out Day 1 of the I-71 leg of the TourPutnam CountyCorn Summary: The field had very small diameter stalks and could have problems in the wind. Yield looks like 100 bushels per acre. There was tip-back, aborted ears, smut, GLS and signs of very dry conditions.Soybean Summary: The beans were 32 inches tall and the plants had aborted a few pods. The plants still had many pods and there is average yield potential if they can keep getting more rain. There was a little Septoria.Putnam Co.CornPutnam Co. CornPutnam Co. beansPutnam Co. beans Van Wert CountyCorn Summary: This stand was thin at a 25,000 population and a 110-yield average. There was some limited GLS and it didn’t look bad for as little rain as it had gotten. It was planted April 27 right before a big rain and extended cold weather, which really hurt the stand.Soybean Summary: The canopy was at 33 inches and the first node was at four inches. There was no disease and light bean leaf beetle feeding. There were two to three beans per pod in early pod fill. This field is at least fair with more potential with additional rains.Van Wert Co. cornVan Wert Co. cornVan Wert Co. soybeansVan Wert Co. beans Paulding CountyCorn Summary: This field will yield around 149. The ears were large but the stand was extremely variable with a population of 26,000 or so. The confidence in the estimate may be high though due to variable stands outside of the check area. We found tassel ear in the field and it was planted late, still pollinating.Soybean Summary: There was some insect feeding and the canopy was short at 25 inches. It was podded well but yield is average in this field. We found what may be sudden death syndrome in small areas.Paulding Co. cornPaulding Co. cornPaulding Co. beansPaulding Co. beansDefiance CountyCorn Summary: There was a population of 32,000 with some denitrification due to dry conditions. You could see the crack from the knife when they put on anhydrous. The ground never closed back up. It was planted between May 22 and May 29. It had a yield of 130. There was no real disease pressure.Soybean Summary: There was a canopy height of 32 inches with a node height of 4.5 inches. There was no disease pressure and light bean leaf beetle feeding. There were many two or three bean pods with a fair overall rating and great weed control.Defiance Co. cornDefiance Co. CornDefiance Co. beansDefiance Co. beansHardin County Corn Summary: Planted on May 9 looks like around 150 bushels at a population of 34,000. A little GLS but not enough to spray. Stalk strength looks good but fired up three to four collars,  though not past the ear. The stand looks good but tipped back ears from the hot and dry conditions, maybe 20 bushels worth.Bean Summary: Population around 130,000 and canopy at 40 inches or so the pods were three inches apart with many thee-bean pods and no disease. We saw a lot of hovering flies and a few Japanese beetles, but nothing serious. Good yield potential, maybe in the 50s with the nice recent  rain.Hardin Co. cornHardin Co. Corn fired up from dry conditions.Hardin Co. beansHardin Co. Beans Allen CountyCorn Summary: The population was 24,000 with a yield around 136 for the April 27 planted corn. There was very little disease, if any. The field struggled with emergence early. It was moderately dry here with 6 inches in June and 1.5 inches in July. It just got a nice rain.Soybean Summary: This gravel underlay farm has a 125,000 population with 34 inches on the consistent canopy height. The node height was 3.5 inches and many three and four bean pods. No disease and light insect pressure. They were planted May 23 with average to good yield potential.Allen Co. cornAllen Co. cornAllen Co. BeansAllen Co. soybeans Hancock CountyCorn Summary: This field had 140 bushels per acre with heavy GLS. Half the field looks good and half looks bad. It was planted May 16 and suffered some denitrification with some smut and drought stress. The plants had cannibalized themselves in some parts of the fields with a population of 33,000 or 34,000.Soybean Summary: Canopy highest was at 30 inches with low disease pressure and a little insect feeding. There were several Japanese beetles making babies. Pods were filling with fair yield potential for this field. This was one of the cleaner fields in terms of weed pressure.Hancock Co. cornHancock Co. cornHancock Co. soybeansHancock Co. soybeans Seneca CountyCorn Summary: This field was planted May 23 and suffered from drought. The population is 33,000 and has good ear fill with no disease. The stalk quality is still good and the yield is 140.Soybean Summary: The canopy is at 31 inches and it is a clean field. There is maybe a little mold developing and really no insect pressure. It has been dry here but there was a nice rain recently. There is pretty decent yield potential in this field. Seneca Co. cornThe dry ares of the field show from above in this Seneca Co. corn.Seneca Co. cornThere was some mold growing in the Seneca Co. bean field after the recent rains.Wood CountyCorn Summary: The field was at 34,000 population with a yield at 152 planted May 19. It had the least denitrification of a field we have been in so far. There was significant tip-back and a little green snap in the field from some wind early in the season. Minimal GLS and little insect feeding.Soybean Summary: We saw 38 inches tall for the canopy and 3.5 inches on the node height. We had three bean pods with a few bean leaf beetles. Not much disease in these 7.5-inch row beans. The field was clean with a fair yield potential in the low 40s.Wood Co. cornGreen snap in Wood Co. cornWood Co. BeansWood Co. Beans Henry CountyCorn Summary: There was a 28,000 population with no disease, no insects and good ear fill. There was quite a bit of ear size variability with a yield of 146 bushels. It was planted May 22.Soybean Summary: This was the tallest canopy of the day so far at close to 40 inches. Very healthy with good pod set and still blooming in the very good to excellent yield potential field.Henry Co. CornHenry Co. CornHenry Co. BeansHenry Co. beans Fulton CountyCorn Summary: We saw a yield of 146. It was a replant situation and the replant was not going to make anything. There was not a lot of drought stress but we saw a major insect issue with western bean cutworm in two of the six Bt corn ears we pulled. The population was 33,000 and it was planted in April and replanted the end of May.Soybean Summary: We had a canopy height that averaged 38 inches with a first node around three inches. There was no disease or insect pressure with many three-bean pods. There were many pods with good yield potential.Fulton Co. Corn with Western Bean Cutworm damageWestern bean cutworm cause damage in two of the six ears pulled in Fulton Co.Fulton Co. beansFulton Co. beans Williams CountyCorn Summary: This was a good stand but a low population of 27,000. There was no disease or insect pressure, though there was one ear with zipper ear and a little tip-back. The kernel depth was excellent with an average yield of 195 bushels in by far the best corn we have seen. It was planted May 20 with multi-hybrid and variable rate.Soybean Summary: The canopy was at 38 inches, the tallest we have seen. They were still blooming and pods were still forming. There was a fungicide application and no diseases or insects present.Williams Co. cornWilliams Co. cornWilliams Co. BeansWilliams Co. Beanslast_img

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